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mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history


In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.
They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.
But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.
This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.
The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.
“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.
It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.
In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.
“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”
He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.
“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.
“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”



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mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history

In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.

They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.

But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.

This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.

The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.

“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.

It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.

In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.

“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”

He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.

“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.

“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”

(via oosik)

— 16 hours ago with 174 notes
miguelalmagro:

Soy un consumidor occidental que hoy ha vuelto de vacaciones…..
He conectado el televisor…. enseguida me he arrepentido….
El aparato solo escupe horror….
Una vez mas tengo miedo, necesito huir….no quiero abandonar la cómoda burbuja que envuelve mi modo de vida, prefiero ignorar la realidad….
Saldré al exterior con una venda en los ojos…
Mientras camino entre futuras ruinas…puedo oirlo
Krakj!…..krakj!…..krakj…
Algo se está rompiendo……
Bienvenidos al infierno.
.

miguelalmagro:

Soy un consumidor occidental que hoy ha vuelto de vacaciones…..

He conectado el televisor…. enseguida me he arrepentido….

El aparato solo escupe horror….

Una vez mas tengo miedo, necesito huir….no quiero abandonar la cómoda burbuja que envuelve mi modo de vida, prefiero ignorar la realidad….

Saldré al exterior con una venda en los ojos…

Mientras camino entre futuras ruinas…puedo oirlo

Krakj!…..krakj!…..krakj…

Algo se está rompiendo……

Bienvenidos al infierno.

.

— 17 hours ago with 24 notes

sociology-of-space:

Bench to Bedroom: Urban Furniture Turned Homeless Shelters

http://weburbanist.com/2014/07/24/bench-to-bedroom-public-furniture-turned-homeless-shelters/

"Whereas London and Montreal have installed spikes on the sidewalks to keep homeless people from getting too comfortable, Vancouver offers a kind welcome with benches that transform into mini-shelters. A nonprofit called RainCity Housing teamed up with Spring Advertising to create the modified public benches in order to provide a covered place to sleep while simultaneously raising awareness….”

(via socio-logic)

— 17 hours ago with 501 notes
mapsontheweb:

Europe - mother’s mean age at first birth
Read More

mapsontheweb:

Europe - mother’s mean age at first birth

Read More

— 1 day ago with 77 notes
Erdős’ age anecdote

curiosamathematica:

Paul Erdős, the most prolific mathematician in history, always made jokes about his age. He said for instance that he is 2.5 billion years old, because in his youth the age of the Earth was said to be 2 billion years old and around 1970, it was known to be 4.5 billion years.

— 1 day ago with 71 notes

adventuresinchemistry:

Scientifically is an underutilized adverb. Pretty much everything is better when described that way. For example:

She experimented scientifically.

He pipetted scientifically.

They scientifically danced away from the oncoming zombie hordes they had accidentally created.

— 1 day ago with 67 notes

See on deviantart

Fabric case I made for my laptop, yaaay for dapper bunnies and flowery giraffes.  

— 2 days ago with 2 notes
#craft  #crafts  #sewing  #fabric  #case  #DIY  #my art 
terrytoon:

Last sneak peek of the night! Electro is seriously juiced right now, but Spidey can still take em! #thespectacularspiderman #terrytoon #drawing #sketch #sneakpeek #spiderman #electricity #villian #marvel #marvelcomics #marvelanimation #maxdillon

terrytoon:

Last sneak peek of the night! Electro is seriously juiced right now, but Spidey can still take em! #thespectacularspiderman #terrytoon #drawing #sketch #sneakpeek #spiderman #electricity #villian #marvel #marvelcomics #marvelanimation #maxdillon

— 2 days ago with 8 notes
iscreamnails:

#regram @morganmarxx 💕💕💕💕💕💕💕💕💕 #nails #nailart #melbournenailart #iscreamnails

iscreamnails:

#regram @morganmarxx 💕💕💕💕💕💕💕💕💕 #nails #nailart #melbournenailart #iscreamnails

— 2 days ago with 18 notes

the-elderscrolls:

i cannot grasp the concept of ppl saying “i won’t use algebra for anything math is useless” dude you’re literally blogging from a device created with the pure knowledge of mathematics

(via theropodthoughts)

— 2 days ago with 40 notes

See on deviantart

I made this t-shirt using Americana’s image transfer medium and one of my original drawings. You can see the process recorded on video here 

— 2 days ago with 4 notes
#artists on tumblr  #custom t-shirt  #image transfer  #ink transfer  #DIY  #my art  #runlittledeer 

natalikoromotoart:

Some sketches:

Sailor Moon, Tuxedo Mask, Neptune, Mars, Pluto and Saturn. ☆╮☾♡☽╰☆

— 2 days ago with 1858 notes
#sailor moon