Feel free to ask anything :)    Ana H. From Spain, Civil Engineering student, occasional artist, full time wonderer.
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"After the earth dies, some 5 billion years from now, after it’s burned to a crisp, or even swallowed by the Sun, there will be other worlds and stars and galaxies coming into being - and they will know nothing of a place once called Earth."
Carl Sagan (via raikaxy)

(Source: saddest-summer, via psychotic-science)

— 14 hours ago with 10636 notes

magnezone:

please don’t ever try to get my attention by neglecting me because i will alienate myself from you at terminal velocity 

(via brainsx)

— 14 hours ago with 66226 notes

davizlopez:

It’s been amazing! kellysue just mentioned my new Tumblr and lots of people came in. Thank you, guys!

To celebrate let me share some (fortunately) unused character sketches.

Maravilloso :D 

— 19 hours ago with 107 notes
Physicist creates color changing ice cream

8bitfuture:

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A Spanish physicist has created an ice cream that changes color as it’s eaten.

Read More

(Source: phys.org)

— 19 hours ago with 170 notes
#spaniards + science = awesome 
"Don’t fool yourself. English isn’t inherently superior, or easier to learn, or more sonically pleasing. Its international usage comes from forceful assimilation and legacy of colonialistic injection. It isn’t a deed that one should take pride in."
my uncle left this comment on his friend’s Facebook status, a white British man who was bragging about how easy it is to be a native English speaker when trekking to different nations. (via commanderspock)

(Source: maarnayeri, via anthrocentric)

— 21 hours ago with 62219 notes
Kind of Blue

materialsworld:

What colour robe does the Virgin Mary wear?

Top marks. But why? 

Perhaps the most watertight explanation is one I learnt today at the Making Colour exhibition at London’s National Gallery. During the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the pigment ultramarine – from the Latin ‘beyond the sea’ – was extracted from the semi-precious stone lapis lazuli, which was mined in what is now Afghanistan and imported into Europe. It was more expensive than gold. In times when most art was emphatically religious, the sheer luxuriance of it demonstrated the artist’s personal devotion.

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The Virgin in Prayer by Giovanni Sassoferrato, 1640-50. © The National Gallery, London.

In order to extract the pure blue pigment, the mineral would be ground into a fine powder, mixed with wax, pine resin and gum arabic, kneaded and finally diluted in an alkaline bath. Then all of this would be repeated several times.

Even during the Renaissance, there were cheaper ways to capture blue – but you’d get what you pay for. Azurite, a deep-blue copper carbonate mineral was one option and the main source of blue pigment in Northern Europe, but it wasn’t the same rich blue, it had a greenish tint. Cobalt glass – or smalt ­– again was less expensive, but was also unstable when combined with oils.

It wasn’t until 1828 that the French chemist Jean-Baptiste Guimet created the first synthetic ultramarine pigment comparable to lapis lazuli in colour and permanence. But even today the ‘real thing’ is held in huge regard by artists, and it still doesn’t come cheap, either.

 image

In 2008, the British artist Roger Hiorns found another way to create an arresting blue, harnessing the power of crystallisation to create his installation ‘Seizure’. He pumped an abandoned council flat with over 75,000 litres of liquid copper sulphate, and left it to become overgrown with glowing, piercing blue crystals. There’s a lump of it in the National Gallery now and it’s almost hypnotising.

That’s just a bit about blue. The exhibition covers the entire rainbow in depth, and being the National Gallery, it illustrates the use of colours with the assistance of originals from many historical masters of art.

image© Royal Academy of Arts, London

There’s also a very interesting video and experiment, which tests your perception of colour and leaves you wondering what colour really is. The last question was something like this: has this exhibition changed the way you look at colour? I pressed yes. For those interested in where art and science meet – and the crossovers are almost endless – this is a must-see exhibition. It’s running until 7 September.

Here’s what they have to say about purple.

By Simon Frost

— 23 hours ago with 28 notes
#pigments 

spacehamsters:

remember rob liefeld enchantress

image

(via captionread)

— 23 hours ago with 69 notes
Anonymous asked: Explain to me scientifically what makes science so great


Answer:

chroniclesofachemist:

I honestly don’t have the energy to write a witty post, so here is a pannel from a what appears to be XKCD instead.

— 1 day ago with 21 notes
"You can’t go around building a better world for people. Only people can build a better world for people. Otherwise it’s just a cage."

Witches Abroad, Terry Pratchett (via n0b0by)

Well, last time I checked I am a person.

(via paradoxicalechoes)

#MAYBE THIS ADVICE IS AIMED AT NON-PERSONS? #I MEAN I WOULDN’T BE THAT SURPRISED IF IT WAS IN THE CONTEXT OF THE STORY #BUT EVEN IF IT IS #I STILL QUESTION IT’S RELEVANCE TO THIS WORLD

In context, “you” is Lily Weatherwax, who is a witch who decided it was a good idea to give everyone happy endings by her definition of happy endings, which is basically uncorrelated with what the people themselves actually want. The statement is, in context, pro-autonomy and anti-cultural-imperialism: ultimately, it is up to the people affected to decide what a better world looks like and how they would like to go about getting it; people who are unaffected can help, but it’s not their job to lead.  

(via ozymandias271)

(via dirt-nerd)

— 1 day ago with 309 notes
sarahcatface:

a portrait of the beautiful sinndee

sarahcatface:

a portrait of the beautiful sinndee

(via mscatface)

— 1 day ago with 88 notes

drtanner:

suicunesrider:

uneditededit:

Remember in 1993 when Jurassic Park was like…the end all, be all of special effects?

image

not gonna lie that still looks intimately real

I’m still somewhat convinced that someone sold their soul to create the special effects in Jurassic Park because that shit is over 20 years old and it still really, really holds up, better than the stuff in a lot of current movies, even.

Fucking witchcraft, man. 

(via shychemist)

— 1 day ago with 66090 notes
johnathanmartel:

More progress on the pink ghost. #art #illustration#psychedelic #surreal #haunted #head #farbercastell #prismacolor #colorpencils #nupastel

johnathanmartel:

More progress on the pink ghost. #art #illustration#psychedelic #surreal #haunted #head #farbercastell #prismacolor #colorpencils #nupastel

— 1 day ago with 34 notes
cwloc:

so obsessed with drawing stylish people now. these are from a Japanese #streetstyle website i follow👀 #illustration

cwloc:

so obsessed with drawing stylish people now. these are from a Japanese #streetstyle website i follow👀 #illustration

— 1 day ago with 41 notes
wishcandy:

Almost done with my last piece for “Heads will roll” this Saturday in LA. Excited to be working larger than usual. 😚💕

wishcandy:

Almost done with my last piece for “Heads will roll” this Saturday in LA. Excited to be working larger than usual. 😚💕

— 1 day ago with 96 notes