Feel free to ask anything :)    Ana H. From Spain, Civil Engineering student, occasional artist, full time wonderer.
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gazpachoagridulce:

Medicina tradicional china
mucho sufrimiento… ¿rápida curación?

gazpachoagridulce:

Medicina tradicional china

mucho sufrimiento… ¿rápida curación?

— 2 hours ago with 13 notes
alphynix:

mindblowingscience:

Primordial Giant Kangaroos Did Not Hop, They Walked

The large marsupials of the middle Miocene that grazed the planet some 16 million years ago did not resemble the hippity-hoppity kangaroos we think of today. Christine Janis and colleagues at Brown University presented this rendering of the large sthenurine kangaroo, a subfamily member of the marsupial family Macropodidae, in PLoS ONE on October 15. Their portrayal of a now-extinct ancestor of the relatively dainty present-day roo illustrates how this “short-faced” marsupial’s unique body size and bone structure would make hopping on its two legs nearly impossible. Scientists speculated previously that the ancient sthenurine’s specialized forelimbs and a rigid lumbar spine would limit its ability to perform a pentapedal walk, or a low-speed gait that kangaroos commonly use instead of hopping. The modern-day kangaroo propels itself forward by putting all four feet on the ground and using its tail as a sturdy fifth limb. After comparing bone and muscle measurements of the sthenurine with today’s kangaroos, Janis’s team found differences that would suggest this species had a completely different gait altogether. The giant kangaroo, weighing an estimated 240 kilograms, appears to have held itself upright, lacking the specialized features that would allow it to hop rapidly. Its firm ankle joints and large hips and knees were likely strong enough to support its body weight on one leg at a time. Such features suggest that it walked like us, one plodding foot in front of the other, with a bit of a bowlegged gait. This stride may have enabled it to browse shrubs and trees for food without expending a lot of energy hopping from low to haute courses in a meal. —Julia Calderone


Modern tree kangaroos sometimes use a similar bipedal gait, as do the unrelated placental pangolins.
It always ends up looking like evolution trying to make a dinosaur-shape out of a mammal.

alphynix:

mindblowingscience:

Primordial Giant Kangaroos Did Not Hop, They Walked

The large marsupials of the middle Miocene that grazed the planet some 16 million years ago did not resemble the hippity-hoppity kangaroos we think of today. Christine Janis and colleagues at Brown University presented this rendering of the large sthenurine kangaroo, a subfamily member of the marsupial family Macropodidae, in PLoS ONE on October 15.
 
Their portrayal of a now-extinct ancestor of the relatively dainty present-day roo illustrates how this “short-faced” marsupial’s unique body size and bone structure would make hopping on its two legs nearly impossible. Scientists speculated previously that the ancient sthenurine’s specialized forelimbs and a rigid lumbar spine would limit its ability to perform a pentapedal walk, or a low-speed gait that kangaroos commonly use instead of hopping.
 
The modern-day kangaroo propels itself forward by putting all four feet on the ground and using its tail as a sturdy fifth limb. After comparing bone and muscle measurements of the sthenurine with today’s kangaroos, Janis’s team found differences that would suggest this species had a completely different gait altogether.
 
The giant kangaroo, weighing an estimated 240 kilograms, appears to have held itself upright, lacking the specialized features that would allow it to hop rapidly. Its firm ankle joints and large hips and knees were likely strong enough to support its body weight on one leg at a time. Such features suggest that it walked like us, one plodding foot in front of the other, with a bit of a bowlegged gait. This stride may have enabled it to browse shrubs and trees for food without expending a lot of energy hopping from low to haute courses in a meal.
 
Julia Calderone

Modern tree kangaroos sometimes use a similar bipedal gait, as do the unrelated placental pangolins.

It always ends up looking like evolution trying to make a dinosaur-shape out of a mammal.

(via shychemist)

— 2 hours ago with 118 notes

runlittledeer:

We are in the mood for pumpkins 

Calabaza frita & Puré de calabaza 

— 15 hours ago with 2 notes
kevinwada:

Sleep Hollow #1 BOOM! Exclusive Cover

kevinwada:

Sleep Hollow #1 BOOM! Exclusive Cover

(via kikedck)

— 19 hours ago with 8366 notes

sentientes:

Amaterasu cosplay from the Wicked and the Divine, worn at WLFCC. Very grateful to my friend for taking these pictures - I love them!

— 19 hours ago with 44 notes

ca-tsuka:

Kon’s Works, 1982-2010.
Finally, a true artbook dedicated to Satoshi Kon.

(via trungles)

— 19 hours ago with 9142 notes
loll3:

🌙 coming soon 💕

loll3:

🌙 coming soon 💕

— 1 day ago with 153 notes

runlittledeer:

See on deviantart 

New bottle I’ve painted! There’s a video of the process here  

— 1 day ago with 7 notes
#self reblogging 

prism-pixels:

Finally getting lots of reblogs on a piece of art but not getting any new followers. 

— 1 day ago with 3 notes
#Follow this great artist! 

realmonstrosities:

callstheadventurescience:

tuggywuggy:

bill:

onlylolgifs:

Computer simulations that teach themselves to walk.

evolution is weird

We can use this to calculate the average body shapes of alien life if we know the planetary conditions

^^^^

The moon looks fun!

Also that second faller in the third one seems to be watching the other two race away. Poor, square-headed dinosaur thing.

(Source: lolgifs.net)

— 1 day ago with 76076 notes
#science  #computer simulation 

sci-universe:

Here are some pictures from India’s Mangalyaan spacecraft.

Oh and here’s the stereotype-breaking picture showing a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success:

(via sci-universe)

— 1 day ago with 854 notes
ingevandormael:

Message me on FB —link below— with an offer I can’t refuse, and this might be yours:) Pen and ink on beer coaster.
https://www.facebook.com/VandormaelInge

ingevandormael:

Message me on FB —link below— with an offer I can’t refuse, and this might be yours:)
Pen and ink on beer coaster.

https://www.facebook.com/VandormaelInge

— 1 day ago with 16 notes

micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola 

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.

Follow micdotcom

(via reallymadscientist)

— 1 day ago with 61656 notes
#ebola