Feel free to ask anything :)    Ana H. From Spain, Civil Engineering student, occasional artist, full time wonderer.
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wscottforbes:

"Equanimous" - 2014.  Part 1 of a 3 part series, more info soon.  If there is enough interest, I may do a limited print run… just let me know.  Thanks and enjoy!

wscottforbes:

"Equanimous" - 2014.  Part 1 of a 3 part series, more info soon.  If there is enough interest, I may do a limited print run… just let me know.  Thanks and enjoy!

— 20 hours ago with 42 notes
neurosciencestuff:

Sleep twitches light up the brain
A University of Iowa study has found twitches made during sleep activate the brains of mammals differently than movements made while awake.
Researchers say the findings show twitches during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep comprise a different class of movement and provide further evidence that sleep twitches activate circuits throughout the developing brain. In this way, twitches teach newborns about their limbs and what they can do with them.
“Every time we move while awake, there is a mechanism in our brain that allows us to understand that it is we who made the movement,” says Alexandre Tiriac, a fifth-year graduate student in psychology at the UI and first author of the study, which appeared this month in the journal Current Biology. “But twitches seem to be different in that the brain is unaware that they are self-generated. And this difference between sleep and wake movements may be critical for how twitches, which are most frequent in early infancy, contribute to brain development.”
Mark Blumberg, a psychology professor at the UI and senior author of the study, says this latest discovery is further evidence that sleep twitches— whether in dogs, cats or humans—are connected to brain development, not dreams.
“Because twitches are so different from wake movements,” he says, “these data put another nail in the coffin of the ‘chasing rabbits’ interpretation of twitches.”
For this study, Blumberg, Tiriac and fellow graduate student Carlos Del Rio-Bermudez studied the brain activity of unanesthetized rats between 8 and 10 days of age. They measured the brain activity while the animals were awake and moving and again while the rats were in REM sleep and twitching.
What they discovered was puzzling, at first.
“We noticed there was a lot of brain activity during sleep movements but not when these animals were awake and moving,” Tiriac says.
The researchers theorized that sensations coming back from twitching limbs during REM sleep were being processed differently in the brain than awake movements because they lacked what is known as “corollary discharge.”
First introduced by researchers in 1950, corollary discharge is a split-second message sent to the brain that allows animals—including rats, crickets, humans and more—to recognize and filter out sensations generated from their own actions. This filtering of sensations is what allows animals to distinguish between sensations arising from their own movements and those from stimuli in the outside world.
So, when the UI researchers noticed an increase in brain activity while the newborn rats were twitching during REM sleep but not when the animals were awake and moving, they conducted several follow-up experiments to determine whether sleep twitching is a unique self-generated movement that is processed as if it lacks corollary discharge.
The experiments were consistent in supporting the idea that sensations arising from twitches are not filtered: And without the filtering provided by corollary discharge, the sensations generated by twitching limbs are free to activate the brain and teach the newborn brain about the structure and function of the limbs.
“If twitches were like wake movements, the signals arising from twitching limbs would be filtered out,” Blumberg says. “That they are not filtered out suggests again that twitches are special—perhaps special because they are needed to activate developing brain circuits.”
The UI researchers were initially surprised to find the filtering system functioning so early in development.
“But what surprised us even more,” Blumberg says, “was that corollary discharge appears to be suspended during sleep in association with twitching, a possibility that – to our knowledge – has never before been entertained.”

Carlos Del Rio is a friend of mine that left Spain some years ago in a neuroscience adventure to the US! This is soo cool :D 

neurosciencestuff:

Sleep twitches light up the brain

A University of Iowa study has found twitches made during sleep activate the brains of mammals differently than movements made while awake.

Researchers say the findings show twitches during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep comprise a different class of movement and provide further evidence that sleep twitches activate circuits throughout the developing brain. In this way, twitches teach newborns about their limbs and what they can do with them.

“Every time we move while awake, there is a mechanism in our brain that allows us to understand that it is we who made the movement,” says Alexandre Tiriac, a fifth-year graduate student in psychology at the UI and first author of the study, which appeared this month in the journal Current Biology. “But twitches seem to be different in that the brain is unaware that they are self-generated. And this difference between sleep and wake movements may be critical for how twitches, which are most frequent in early infancy, contribute to brain development.”

Mark Blumberg, a psychology professor at the UI and senior author of the study, says this latest discovery is further evidence that sleep twitches— whether in dogs, cats or humans—are connected to brain development, not dreams.

“Because twitches are so different from wake movements,” he says, “these data put another nail in the coffin of the ‘chasing rabbits’ interpretation of twitches.”

For this study, Blumberg, Tiriac and fellow graduate student Carlos Del Rio-Bermudez studied the brain activity of unanesthetized rats between 8 and 10 days of age. They measured the brain activity while the animals were awake and moving and again while the rats were in REM sleep and twitching.

What they discovered was puzzling, at first.

“We noticed there was a lot of brain activity during sleep movements but not when these animals were awake and moving,” Tiriac says.

The researchers theorized that sensations coming back from twitching limbs during REM sleep were being processed differently in the brain than awake movements because they lacked what is known as “corollary discharge.”

First introduced by researchers in 1950, corollary discharge is a split-second message sent to the brain that allows animals—including rats, crickets, humans and more—to recognize and filter out sensations generated from their own actions. This filtering of sensations is what allows animals to distinguish between sensations arising from their own movements and those from stimuli in the outside world.

So, when the UI researchers noticed an increase in brain activity while the newborn rats were twitching during REM sleep but not when the animals were awake and moving, they conducted several follow-up experiments to determine whether sleep twitching is a unique self-generated movement that is processed as if it lacks corollary discharge.

The experiments were consistent in supporting the idea that sensations arising from twitches are not filtered: And without the filtering provided by corollary discharge, the sensations generated by twitching limbs are free to activate the brain and teach the newborn brain about the structure and function of the limbs.

“If twitches were like wake movements, the signals arising from twitching limbs would be filtered out,” Blumberg says. “That they are not filtered out suggests again that twitches are special—perhaps special because they are needed to activate developing brain circuits.”

The UI researchers were initially surprised to find the filtering system functioning so early in development.

“But what surprised us even more,” Blumberg says, “was that corollary discharge appears to be suspended during sleep in association with twitching, a possibility that – to our knowledge – has never before been entertained.”

Carlos Del Rio is a friend of mine that left Spain some years ago in a neuroscience adventure to the US! This is soo cool :D 

— 20 hours ago with 91 notes
#neuroscience 

runlittledeer:

I got those shoes for 5 euros, I wish I could wear them in not festive events 

See on deviantart 

— 2 days ago with 4 notes
#selfreblogging  #i'm so self centered 
aseaofquotes:

Anton DiSclafani, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls

aseaofquotes:

Anton DiSclafani, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls

(Source: aseaofquotes, via science-in-a-jar)

— 2 days ago with 3335 notes

I got those shoes for 5 euros, I wish I could wear them in not festive events 

See on deviantart 

— 3 days ago with 4 notes
#spain  #feria  #self-portrait  #I don't even know how to tag this  #runlittledeer  #life and circumstances 

rubyetc:

I don’t know what this is

(Source: rubyetc)

— 3 days ago with 2715 notes
therarebirdoakland:

Hand crafted turtle by the Jemez Pueblo artists. #nancysgarden #turtlelove #happysaturday

therarebirdoakland:

Hand crafted turtle by the Jemez Pueblo artists. #nancysgarden #turtlelove #happysaturday

— 3 days ago with 4 notes
Anonymous asked: why do you always draw characters kinda chubby? I mean I got no problem with a girl with more to love on them and beauty comes in all sizes etc etc, but you tend to draw characters, that are quite slender or have low body fat percent in canon, to be a bit bigger? Is that personal preference, or is it just your style? Or are you trying to make some kinda statement?


Answer:

bevsi:

I don’t even think it’s a stylistic thing lol I try to depict actual body proportions, human beings waists aren’t actually smaller than their wrists. And I’m sayin this as a pretty thin person ? I’m not trynna make a statement but I’m thinkin those who think my drawings are unusually chubby should like. Look at a human being even thin ones

When I was 14 years old I drew a fairy/angel creature (that was basically a teen girl with green skin and wings) while we were in class, and at the end one of my female friends approached me and asked: “Why did you draw her chubby?”; and I looked at her in disbelief because the girl I had drawn had the same body type as her, and she was thin and sporty.  
I even have the original drawing to show you:  

— 3 days ago with 99 notes
#beauty standards...  #my art  #life and circumstances 
Superhero comics with ethnic diversity

superheroladies:

Mighty Avengers 8+ 

Ms. Marvel 8+

Nova 8+

Batgirl 14+ part 1part 2part 3, and part 4

All-New Ghost Rider

Blue Beetle 8+ #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 #28 #29 #30 #31 #32 #33 #34 #35 #36

White Tiger 14+

Black Panther 12+

Storm 16+ (tw for attempted rape. It’s engaging but problematic as hell) she also has a current ongoing title you can pre-order 

Daken Dark Wolverine 14+ (he’s also bisexual, since LGBT characters of color are sadly rare) #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9.1 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16  #17 #18

Batwing 14+ 

The Movement 14+

Iron Patriot

Runaways 12+

Spider-Girl 8+

The Question 14+ (for a better understanding Batwoman might help. Both have LGBT leads)

Ultimate Comics Spider-Man 12+

Hawkgirl 13+ (don’t buy it since it’s just an okay read, not worth the money but it’s interesting to see. Also the art is awful)

Glory 16+

A collection of short-lived DC comics 

Those bolded need support so you have to buy, the rest you can just download online for free. If you want links for free downloads, come to me off anon. I support downloading books that are old because I know comics are a luxury that not everyone can afford. The downloads I linked were from Comic Masterposts. 

— 3 days ago with 453 notes

Little visitors we get at home 

Escarabajo rinoceronte europeo ~ European rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes nasicornis)

Salamanquesa ~ Wall gecko (Tarentola mauritanica

— 3 days ago with 72 notes
#biology  #zoology  #animals  #insects  #gecko  #beetle  #rhinoceros beetle  #life and circumstances  #my pictures